Wednesday, August 21, 2019

King Timmy

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Thanks to Timmy himself for sharing with us the first poster for David Michôd's The King, a Shakespearean retelling starring him and Joel Edgerton, which is hitting Netflix (and some theaters I imagine) this fall. This must mean we're getting a trailer soon, maybe? I hope I hope. I wanna see that hair-do in motion. (And do you think he dropped this to distract from the Woody Allen movie news?)
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Bobby Goes Blonde

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Finally some forward momentum on The Assassination of Jesse James director Andrew Dominik's next movie, his adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates' book about Marilyn Monroe called Blonde -- he's just cast Bobby Cannavale to play the baseball player Joe DiMaggio and Adrien Brody to play the playwright Arthur Miller, aka two of Marilyn's famous husbands. (She was also married once earlier before she became a star.) Here's a picture of a young DiMaggio in the locker-room just cuz: 

You know, for comparison's sake with up top. I've never read Oates' book although I have a copy buried in my apartment somewhere, I guess I should dig it up -- have you read it? Anyway this project keeps reminding me of Nicolas Roeg's 1985 movie Insignificance that has thinly veiled ("thinly" being kind) versions of Marilyn and DiMaggio randomly meeting up with Joe McCarthy and Albert Einstein in a hotel room. That's a weird ass movie, isn't it?


Adam Brody Three Times

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I'm really very annoyed that I haven't gotten to see Ready or Not yet when I very much want to, hence why I haven't posted much about the buzzy horror flick out this weekend. But these photos of Adam Brody in the new GQ are really too adorable not to post, so I'll make this exception. There's also an interview at that link, although it's mostly about The OC and I didn't really watch The OC save a couple times -- I didn't crush on Adam until Jennifer's Body, because I got class, motherfucker.
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Rainy Skies Gonna Clear Up

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Woody Allen's film A Rainy Day in New York, starring Elle Fanning and Timothee Chalamet, might not ever see the light of day here in the US (I hope that's not true, but whatever, we have the internet now, we'll see it somehow) but it's getting a rather big push in Europe -- it's opening the Deauville American Film Festival in France on September 6th, and that picture of its two stars up top is a new one to my eye. The movie's already out in a few random countries -- Poland and Greece and Lithuania, sure why not -- and is hitting several more over the next several months. We posted its trailer here, if you missed it. I suppose whenever it hits DVD somewhere, that's when we'll see it...
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Thom Yorke's Daily Battles

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The only movie that's getting a gala screening at the New York Film Festival that I haven't posted about yet -- the other two are Martin Scorsese's The Irishman, posted about here, and Noah Baumbach's Marriage Story, posted about here -- is Edward Norton's Motherless Brooklyn, which is the Closing Night Film. But today's given us a marvelous excuse to fix that! A song from Motherless Brooklyn was just released, and not just any ol' song -- it's a song by my main squeeze Thom Yorke! It's called "Daily Battles" and you can listen to it right here:
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Rolling Stone debuted the track along with some words from Norton about how the song came to be, read that all here. Oh and also at that link there's a cover version of that same song done by Wynton Marsalis! Something for everybody! Motherless Brooklyn is an adaptation of the Jonathan Lethem novel of the same name, which Norton transferred from the modern-day New York borough to a 1950s Noir-ish setting. They also released some pictures this week, featuring Norton and Willem Dafoe and Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Alec Baldwin Bruce Willis, and I'll share them after the jump...

Five Frames From ?

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What movie is this?
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Good Morning, World

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The latest issue of Interview Magazine has delivered us a real treat, a conversation between Almodóvar regulars Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz -- click here to read the whole thing, and to check out another picture I haven't posted. They mainly speak about their new movie Pain and Glory, which is out here in the US on October 4th (after playing the New York Film Festival) -- click here to watch its trailer. Yesterday I was just speaking of the film, which I've now seen, with some love for Antonio's other co-star Asier Etxeandia. Here's a choice bit from Antonio & Penelope's chat:

"Curiosity is fundamental. There is a moment in life — and I had this experience two and a half years ago with my cardiac issues — when you realize that there is only room for the truth. There is a moment when you say, “If it is not something that is completely true for me, I’m not interested.” You realize that years are passing by and that life is getting shorter. During the rehearsal period, Pedro said to me, “Antonio, since you had your heart attack, there is something in you that has changed. Do not be afraid to show that part of you.” I knew exactly what he was talking about. When you see death so closely, it leaves a mark and it stays there, sticking to the heart. Pedro detected it, and I used it throughout the movie. It is a type of sadness—not depression, just the character’s sadness of knowing that death exists. Penélope, deep down you know it, that we are no more than the experiences we have. Us actors, we live off of that. If there are no experiences, there is nothing."

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

There's No U in Antarctica

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Sometimes the best times to contemplate our worst bits are when we're not planning on it. Sometimes the self-reflection sneaks in, unexpected like, a thief in the broad daylight, sniffing and snuffing and huffing about. Sometimes it's got a sharp bob hairdo and big black sunglasses and every mannerism and tic that Cate Blanchett can toss at it, and yet it cuts you to the quick.

So it went with Richard Linklater's new film Where'd You Go, Bernadette, a film I had absolutely zero intention of seeing -- not until it started getting baffled notices from critics, anyway. They reminded me of Bernie, Linklater's 2011 film with Jack Black and the only time I ever truly vibed on what Linklater was selling. I went in on a lark really -- I hadn't read the book; I hadn't even watched a trailer. It was a hot day and anything with Blanchett can't be that bad, right?

Bernadette is not that bad. It's not bad at all, actually. Yes it's broad and yes it's the tonal equivalent of gumbo -- a shock of stews steeped in each other, all piled high -- but sometimes you've gotta go broad to make your point, and Bernadette delivered more to me emotionally with its cartoonish flair than many a more Serious Movie movie that I've seen this year. 

Blanchett plays Bernadette Fox, a woman who won a genius grant once and then kept disappearing. The movie meets her as a colorful mess of a Mom, holed up in a dripping house with a husband and kid who love her but don't seem to get her. Only as the rugs get pulled and the vines knotted underneath get their moments to shine do we see how self-inflicted Bernadette's wounds are, and how the movie is winding its weird-ass path just in order to whittle down and speak one on one with the closed-off weirdos inside all of us.

Where'd You Go Bernadette is big and bright and open about shutting down -- it's something like a comic kiddie movie about adult depression and self-sabotage. It zigs when anything else would be zagging, and in its strangeness found ways to shuffle around my own defenses -- I couldn't put up a fight with it, not when suddenly Kristen Wiig's rolling around on the pavement before I could argue. It didn't fight fair, and hugged me when I wanted to punch it. And I found myself, whaddya wonder, deeply moved.

I saw so much, too much, of myself in Blanchett's Bernadette, who'd rather run over a neighbor than have a common conversation -- who deeply loves the people she's let in, to a near smothering degree, but can't seem to carve space for much more. (This is a real Cancer's movie.) All of her energies are aimed in aimless directions -- she's got too much to give, so she's given up, paralyzed and poisoned by the insecurities she's let take hold.

Like I said, this is a lot for a movie with penguin jokes and pratfalls! But the penguin jokes are the cake they're hiding the pills in -- good cake, delicious cake, and I felt a little bit better after than before. A movie that can do that, well, eat it up. Pills and all.
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The Spy Who Spied On Me in the Shower

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The title of the 27th James Bond film has been revealed today 
via the 007 Twitter account, and it is drumroll please...

I was kind of hoping they'd go with
 Speedo Party but I guess this'll do.
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You Should Find This Good Woman

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Even though I didn't make it up to Montreal for the Fantasia Film Fest last month I managed to see quite a few movies thanks to the wonders of technology -- I rounded up the ones I reviewed at this link. But there were several I watched that I didn't get a chance to review, and one of those whaddya know was actually very very good and I wish I had reviewed it. It's called A Good Woman is Hard to Find and it stars an absolutely terrific Sarah Bolger (from that Mayans BC show as well as Into the Badlands) as a young widowed mother who gets sucked into a world of crime through bad chance, and finds herself going way above her pay-grade figuring her way out of it. (Psst shit goes wrong real bad.)

Oh and hey the film co-stars lil' Andrew Simpson, last seen by me as the teen boy who Cate Blanchett romanced in Notes on a Scandal! Remember that? Anyway the film doesn't have a U.S. release date yet but I think it will eventually, it's good enough that somebody should pick it up, but it is being released in the UK in October and they've given us our first trailer, so let's check it out shall we:
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Asier Etxeandia Two Times

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I was lucky enough to catch a screening of Pedro Almodóvar's latest much anticipated film Pain & Glory last week (here's the trailer; the film is playing the NYFF next month) and I'll have way way way more to say on it when the time comes for that but for now let me just make sure that Asier Etxeandia here is on everybody's radars, if he's not already, because he might've been my favorite thing in the whole shebang. If you watch Netflix's Spanish soap called Velvet (which co-stars another Almodovar actor, one Miguel Angel Silvestre) you might already be intimate with Asier, but I don't so I was not and he packs a hell of a wallop, you guys.  I'm not just talking about his looks either, although those are clearly a bonus -- he gives a wonderful performance in the movie. Moving, funny; him and Banderas have great chemistry. 


Everything You Ever Need To Know About Life...

... you can learn from:


Helen: Smash up somebody's car when you're drunk and write out a check. Get in a mess with a showgirl and write out a check. And when a man dies, write out a check to his widow. Account paid in full.

That dastardly Jane Wyman might not see the value in a buck but Criterion's fancy-pantsy blu-ray edition of Sirk's mellifluous melodrama hits home-theaters today and if you haven't yet you should snatch up a copy at this link, hifalutin moral standards be damned. I mean you could maybe spend your money better by going to medical school to learn how to save the eyeballs of the woman you're somewhat responsible for blinding, but where's the fun in that? In summation, just hit Jane Wyman with a car and call it a day:


Five Frames From ?

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What movie is this?
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Good Morning, World

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We've still got a couple of weeks until It: Chapter 2 hits screens but James McAvoy's already declaring it "Time to float" on his Instagram -- I know he's kidding but he should be careful or he might summon up a devil clown into the center of that inflatable ring. And clearly by "devil clown" I mean "me with my arms outstretched waiting for James McAvoy in wet underwear to fall into my arms." Clearly. I wear my "devil clown" badge proudly.


Monday, August 19, 2019

Who Wore It Best?

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I have posted about the 1975 film Royal Flash before -- directed by Superman director Richard Lester it stars Malcolm McDowell as well as nude-wrestling-friends Alan Bates and Oliver Reed, seen above -- but I still haven't watched it, even though that earlier post makes note of the movie being available to watch for free here on ye olde internet. It's uploaded onto YouTube now, even:
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But since I just stumbled upon these photos of Bates & Reed being their typical scamp selves and I to be quite frank am having a real case of the braindead Mondays this afternoon, let's just give ourselves a luxurious stache poll to soak in and call it a day:

survey tool

Hot Priest Heads North

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It seems I very much have got to go back and read Phillip Pullman's original His Dark Materials trilogy of books now, because Andrew "Hot Priest" Scott just got cast in the forthcoming HBO miniseries adaptation as a character I can't recall in the slightest, not even after reading the full Wiki entry for him. I mean I know he is playing John Parry aka Jopari, the father of Will,  the lead character of the second book The Subtle Knife. And it sounds like... well, he's got his hands in a lot. It's all spoilery so I don't want to dive into specifics -- it's just been a good 15 years since I re-read the trilogy so it's overdue, clearly, is my point. But hurray for Andrew Scott! Always and always Andrew Scott. Click here if you haven't seen the trailer for the HBO adaptation.
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My Favorite Tiger Lady

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It's our gal Joan Allen's 63rd birthday tomorrow so if you click on over to The Film Experience we've given some love to one of her under-sung performances -- Reba in  Michael Mann's original Lecter joint Mindhunter. She is terrific in the role and I wanted to focus on Joan because of her birthday, but I do wish I could've worked in a reference to Rutina Wesley's performance on Hannibal in the same part, because she too knocked this character outta the park.


Aaron Taylor-Johnson Four Times

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I haven't read the interview with Aaron and his director-wife Sam in this past weekend's Telegraph because it's behind a pay-wall, but I did get to stare at these photos from its photo-shoot since Aaron was kind enough to Instagram 'em and for that, eternally grateful et cetera et cetera. That bottom shot's a real reminder somebody oughta throw a musical at him, he's a wonderful dancer.
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Everything You Ever Need To Know About Life...

... you can learn from:


Policeman: We found blood in the freezer down in the cellar.
Det. Grogan: Christ! Rich people...
Sick stuff always turns out to be rich people.

Have I got any fans here of the 1990 duology (is that the right word?) Two Evil Eyes, which consists of a pair of half-length films based on Edgar Allen Poe stories, one directed by Dario Argento and the other by George Romero? And starring horror legends Tom Atkins and Adrienne Barbeau, among others?

Well if you're a fan this is a heads-up -- Blue Underground has just announced they're putting out a super-duper blu-ray set in October -- three discs stuffed with special features, far from the least of which is a 4K restoration of the film from its original negative. The second disc has a bunch of docs and interviews which I'll list down below, while the third disc is the film's soundtrack by legendary composer Pino Donaggio. What a thrill! Now you can hit the jump for all of the info...

Five Frames From ?

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What movie is this?
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